Meetings Archive – 2013

Cutting Edge Research — Cultures of the Digital Economy / Dolby Atmos demo

Date: 12 Nov 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Dolby Europe’s London Office
4–6 Soho Square
London W1D 3PZ

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3).

This year’s Cutting Edge Research presents the latest work of Anglia Ruskin University’s Cultures of the Digital Economy Institute (CoDE).

Dr. Rob Toulson will present a brief overview of his department’s work, and a poster presentation will follow in which visitors can see and hear new research, and talk to the staff and students who created it.

A number of audio and music technology research projects are developed at Anglia Ruskin University through their CoDE Research Institute, the Sound Engineering Research Group and the ARU Digital Performance Lab. Research projects are also conducted in collaboration with, for example, Cambridge University and the London College of Music, as well as with industry leaders including DTS, Prism Sound, RPG Acoustics and ARM. Academics at ARU also publish scholarly work in music composition, performance and record production.

Specific projects highlighted will include technologies and initiatives such as:

  • Gestural controllers and tactile sonic arts
  • Acoustic absorber design in thermal mass building projects
  • Loudness and dynamic range of commercial music
  • Electric network frequency analysis
  • Granular synthesis for music composition
  • Percussion acoustics and quantitative drum tuning
  • Music for play and gaming
  • Commercial music production projects

The lecture is being hosted at Dolby’s London theatre. After the poster session, Dolby will host a screening of Elysium to showcase the Dolby Atmos system.


Christmas lecture: Poppy Crum, Dolby Labs

Date: 10 Dec 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Imperial College
South Kensington Campus
London SW7 2AZ

For this year’s Christmas lecture, we are privileged to host Poppy Crum. Dr. Crum is a senior scientist at Dolby Labs in San Francisco, a consulting professor at Stanford University’s CCRMA, and a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society. Her specialisms are in neuroscience and psychoacoustics, the perception of complex acoustic spaces, hearing loss and protection, and experimental design. In addition to her career at Dolby, Dr. Crum has worked as an academic researcher, a violinist and recording engineer.

In this lecture, Dr. Crum will play and explain a number of auditory illusions, exploring the sensory interactions between sound and sight, and how the phenomenon of neuroplasticity affects auditory perception.

Venue details

The lecture will be held in The Gabor Seminar Room, Level 6, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. A campus map is here.

Instructions:

  1. The nearest tube is South Kensington.
  2. From Exhibition Road, enter the campus through the revolving doors in the entrance hall (large yellow arrow on campus map).
  3. Cross the entrance hall and go out through the rear revolving door. The Electrical and Electronic Engineering Building is immediately facing you across the plaza.
  4. Enter the EEE building and take the lift to Level 6. The Gabor Seminar room is signposted.


An Evening with Recording Engineer and Producer, Phill Brown

Date: 19 Nov 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: The Chairworks, Perseverence Works
Morrison Street
Castleford WF10 4BE

 

In a two part interview, we will be discussing the adventures and listening to a life in music of a recording engineer and record producer, whose career starting from the mid-1960’s is still going strong today.

From tape op at Olympic Studios working on sessions for Dusty Springfield, The Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and more he went on to work at Island Record’s London Studios engineering sessions including David Bowie, Sly Stone, Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, Robert Palmer, Bob Marley & The Wailers, Steve Winwood and live recordings for Joni Mitchell and Pink Floyd.

Going Freelance in 1976, Phill worked with artists such as Roxy Music, Go West, Talk Talk, Dido, Beth Gibbons, David Gilmour, Robert Plant, The Bombay Bicycle Club and Zero 7, where from the Stones ‘Beggars Banquet’ to Led Zeppelin’s ‘Stairway to Heaven’, Phill has been at the heart of iconic music of the past 40 years.

 

The agenda for the evening is as follows: -

  • Part 1 – Interview with Phill Brown
  • Refreshments break
  • Part 2 – Listening session and open discussion of Phill’s Recordings, as selected by himself

Please note, tickets are required for entry to this event.  These are free and are available now from EventBrite at – http://aesnorth.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Doors open at 18.00 for a 18.30 start. On-site car parking is available.

Contact: Kerry-Anne Kubisa, AES North Chair - north@aes-uk.org for further information.

 

Keep up to date with all the latest information in the North by joining the North of England Newsletter – Sign Up Here!

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AES_North

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AESnorth

 


Surround Sound Microphones

Date: 8 Jan 2013
Time: 19:00

Location: Royal College of Pathologists
2 Carlton House Terrace
London SW1Y 5DG

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3)

Abstract:

An extended version of the illustrated lecture given by Mike Skeet at the 25th AES UK Conference in York last March.

Mike Skeet with mic

Mike will begin by showing and discussing a number of the stereo microphone rigs he has used for location recording. These are usually for the many aspects of classical and brass band recordings, but on occasions other sound sources such as steam trains, thunder, aircraft and even bird song have been ventured into.

Whilst Mike’s various stereo activities continue, he has now moved on to the use of numerous mic rig approaches to 5.0 ‘horizontal’ surround, and also to very effectively reproducing the ‘missing height’ aspect by the use of three or four additional ceiling-placed loudspeakers.

There will be the opportunity to see the various rigs Mike uses in this practical approach to capturing and reproducing more of the real acoustic world than is normally achieved.

 


Annual General Meeting (Members only)

Date: 8 Jan 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Royal College of Pathologists
2 Carlton House Terrace
London SW1Y 5DG

 

The Annual General Meeting of the AES British Section.
(Open to AES members only. Refreshments will be available for non-members attending
the evening lecture at 7pm.)

The Calling Notice for the AGM and list of candidates for the 2013 Executive Committee was e-mailed to members in late November.

 


AES Technical Visit - British Library Sound Archive (Members only)

Date: 29 Jan 2013
Time: 14:00

Location: British Library Sound Archive
96 Euston Road
London, NW1 2DB

The British Library Sound Archive holds over a million discs and thousands of tapes. Its collections come from all over the world and cover the entire range of recorded sound from music, drama and literature, to oral history and wildlife sounds. Formats range from cylinders made in the late 19th century to the latest digital media.

The visit will include an introductory talk on the work of the Sound Archive and a tour of some of their audio restoration suites.

The start time will be 2pm prompt, meeting in the main lobby of the British Museum (entrance in Euston Road). The duration is expected to be about two hours.

Previous visits to the Sound Archive have always been oversubscribed, and once again numbers will be limited for this members-only event, so early booking is recommended.

We now use EventBrite to handle the bookings for Technical Visits. Simply click on Book Now below to start the process. You will need your AES membership number, which can be found in the subject line of any British Section newsletter.

Please note that this is the only way to book a place, but you do not need to create an EventBrite account in order to obtain your ticket. It will be sent as an attachment to your confirmation e-mail. Just print the ticket out and bring it with you.

Book Now
(AES members only)


Behind the interface: the technical architecture of commercial plug-ins

Date: 12 Feb 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Red Bull Studios
155-171 Tooley Street
London SE1 2JP

Lecture by Gavin Burke, Future Audio Workshop

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3)

Gavin describes what is involved in developing a commercial level audio plug-in, covering topics such as application design, modular audio library design and analogue modelling. He also discusses the internal development process at Future Audio Workshop, and how they went about designing and building their ‘Circle’ soft synth.

 


Applications of thermionic valves in modern recording studios

Date: 12 Mar 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: SAE Institute London
297 Kingsland Road
London E8 4DD

Lecture by Charlie Slee, Thermionic Culture and Dr Rob Toulson, Anglia Ruskin University

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3)

In a world where digital technology has transformed the recording studio and where outboard equipment has been replaced by the DAW, this lecture will take a look into the importance of valve outboard equipment in the modern recording studio.

We will give an introduction into circuit design and the challenges faced when using thermionic valves in the recording studio, and show their benefits and excellence when used properly. We will take an in-depth look into classic designs and their philosophies, and with circuit analysis give an understanding of different topologies and their uses, and explore performance improvement using modern techniques and technologies.

The integration of analogue hardware units within the modern digital recording studio will also be discussed, highlighting a number of emerging technologies which are enabling hybrid recording and mixdown setups.

Bonus Technical Visit
We are very grateful to SAE London for offering a pre-lecture tour of their facilities. If you wish to attend, please be at SAE House reception for 5:45pm. Late arrivals will not be able to join the tour so please arrive promptly.


Live Sound Engineering: The Juxtaposition Of Art and Science

Date: 15 Feb 2013
Time: 18:00

Location: BBC Scotland, Glasgow
40 Pacific Quay
Glasgow, G51 1DA

Lecture by Chuck Knowledge, Front of House engineer for Nero / Dizzee Rascal, Chris McCarron (Pigeon Detectives, Maximo Park, The View)

In this presentation we examine the different disciplines required for modern live event production.
The technical foundations of audio engineering are no longer enough to deliver the experiences demanded by today’s concert goers.
This seminar will discuss practical engineering challenges with consideration for the subjective nature of art and the desire of performing artists to push the technological envelope.

Focal points will include:

  • Transplanting studio production to the live arena.
  • Computer-based solutions and infrastructure requirements.
  • The symbiosis with lighting and video.
  • New technologies for interactivity and audience engagement.
  • New career paths made possible by innovation in these fields.

Attendees can expect insight to the delivery of recent high-profile live events, the relevant enabling technologies, and how to develop their own skill set to remain at the cutting edge.

The meeting is free and open to all. However, registration is required by clicking here.

Please note that this is the only way to book a place, but you do not need to create an EventBrite account in order to obtain your ticket. It will be sent as an attachment to your confirmation e-mail. Just print the ticket out and bring it with you.

 


Wildlife Sound Recording for the BBC

Date: 20 Feb 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Room 4.33, Informatics Forum, University of Edinburgh, Crichton St
Informatics Forum, Crichton St
University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9AB

Presented by Chris Watson

 

Abstract to follow

 

The meeting is free and open to all. However, registration is required by clicking here.

Please note that this is the only way to book a place, but you do not need to create an EventBrite account in order to obtain your ticket. It will be sent as an attachment to your confirmation e-mail. Just print the ticket out and bring it with you.


Student event: Up Your Output!

Date: 9 Mar 2013
Time: 10:00

Location: SAE Institute London
297 Kingsland Road
London E8 4DD

Up Your Output is our annual event for AES student members. Further information is available here.


Audio applications of the Raspberry Pi and other single board computers

Date: 25 Feb 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: SAE Institute Oxford
Littlemore Park, Armstrong Road
Oxford OX4 4FY

18:30 for 19:00 start.

The inaugural lecture of the Oxford group, given by Andy Farnell on “Audio applications of the Raspberry Pi and other single board computers”.

Commodity development boards such the Raspberry Pi and Beagle Board promise to revolutionise educational possibilities. These differ significantly from traditional embedded development. Rather than using JTAG interfacing and specialised tools, common networking and a laptop can be used to develop audio DSP applications. From High school student to PHD researcher, or even commercial product prototyping – this opens up a range of possibilities for speedy development of audio products.

In this lecture we will investigate the basics of developing audio applications on the Raspberry Pi board and will be displaying examples of implementation such as streaming, synthesis and real-time processing.

About The Speaker
Andy Farnell graduated from UCL in computer science and electronic engineering before specialising in digital audio signal processing. He has worked as a sound effects programmer for BBC radio and television and as a programmer on server side applications for product search and data storage. Andy is an experienced teacher, having instructed undergraduate and masters students in software engineering, project management and audio engineering. He currently lives in London with his partner Kate and lectures on advanced synthetic sound modelling for games and interactive applications.

The event will be followed by drinks and networking.

To register your interest and be informed of any changes to this lecture, please complete this form.


Procedural Audio

Date: 9 Apr 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Dolby Europe’s London Office
4–6 Soho Square
London W1D 3PZ

Lecture by Andy Farnell

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3)

As 3D CGI animation is to film and game visuals, procedural audio is the synthesis of sonic material, usually at the point of delivery, based on the behaviour and interaction of sounding object models. It offers enormous advantages for space efficiency and control, providing rich interactive experiences unavailable from sample based methods. Many see it as the future of game audio. Pioneering researcher and author of the textbook Designing Sound, Andy Farnell presents some examples and commentary on the subject.


Vibration Measurements for Acoustic Applications

Date: 15 May 2013
Time: 18:00

Location: Seminar Room, Edinburgh Napier University
42 Colinton Rd
Edinburgh EH10 5BT

Lecture by Joe Armstrong, Polytec

Presentation of different techniques of measuring the movements of vibrating surfaces using the laser vibrometer. Demonstrations of the equipment will be held after the talk.


Advanced Speech-Audio Processing in Mobile Phones and Hearing Aids

Date: 14 May 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: Imperial College
South Kensington Campus
London SW7 2AZ

Lecture by Peter Vary, RWTH Aachen University.

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3).

Mobile phones and modern hearing aids comprise advanced digital signal processing techniques as well as coding algorithms.

From a functional point of view, digital hearing devices and mobile phones are approach­ing each other.  In both types of device, similar or even identical algorithms can be found such as echo, reverberation and feedback control, noise reduction, intelligibility enhancement, artificial bandwidth extension, and binaural processing with two or more microphones.

Actual hearing aids include digital audio receivers and transmitters, not only for communication and entertainment, but also for binaural directional processing. State-of-the-art mobile phones offer new speech-audio compression schemes for the emerging HD-telephone services. They are also equipped with two (or more) microphones for the purpose of speech enhancement. It is not too big a step to realize hearing aid features as apps on smart phones. Further evolution might lead us to binaural mobile telephony, augmenting speech with ambient and spatial information — a preferred solution for audio conferencing, for example.

Despite these similarities, the signal conditions and the processing constraints are quite different: with respect to the coherence of signals, the complexity of algorithms, power consumption, and latency, for example. Synergies and distinctions of the corresponding signal processing and coding algorithms will be discussed. Design constraints and solutions will be presented by examples.

Venue details

The lecture will be held in The Gabor Seminar Room, Level 6, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. A campus map is here.

Instructions:

  1. The nearest tube is South Kensington.
  2. From Exhibition Road, enter the campus through the revolving doors in the entrance hall (large yellow arrow on campus map).
  3. Cross the entrance hall and go out through the rear revolving door. The Electrical and Electronic Engineering Building is immediately facing you across the plaza.
  4. Enter the EEE building and take the lift to Level 6. The Gabor Seminar room is signposted.


An Introduction to Audio for Automotive

Date: 11 Jun 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders
71 Great Peter Street
London, SW1P 2BN

Lecture by Alan Trevena, Jaguar Land Rover.

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automotive audio systems are among the most sophisticated audio systems on the market today, and are often the best systems to which the average consumer has regular exposure.

From the first audio system installed in the 1930’s by the precursor to Motorola to modern in-car entertainment systems with multiple loudspeakers, sophisticated digital signal processing, and high-power amplifiers, automotive audio is constantly evolving.

The presentation will cover a brief history of in-car audio, from the first mono systems to the latest audio systems with 29 loudspeakers and 3D surround. Automotive audio systems offer significant challenges when it comes to reproducing high quality audio. Unique requirements of the loudspeakers will be discussed as well as the durability and reliability requirements that are key parts of any automotive audio system.

 


Introducing the Web Audio API

Date: 8 Oct 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: BBC New Broadcasting House, London
Portland Place
London

Lecture by Chris Lowis, co-chair of the W3C Audio Working Group.

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3).

The Web Audio API is an emerging standard for web browsers which allows the real-time manipulation, analysis and synthesis of audio in web applications using Javascript. We will discuss the origin of the API, show some applications that have been developed, give a brief tour of the API and its features and discuss some of the things it has been used for in the audio industry.


The Third European Student Summit

Date: 13 Sep 2013
Time: 10:00

Location: Belgrade, Serbia
73 Bulevar kralja Aleksandra
Belgrade

The Student Delegate Assembly and the AES Serbian Student Section invites you to the Third European Student Summit, September 13-15.

The event offers attractive program including workshops, lectures and technical tours as well as inevitable student party. All attendees will have chance to take part in dynamic workshops and discussions, learn new things and have unforgettable Belgrade experience. For further information and updates please visit the AES Serbian student section's website.

Three main chapters of the program are Live Audio, Game Audio and Mixing. We are delighted to announce the participation of Mike Senior (Sound on Sound) and Nikolay Georgiev (SAE London). You can download a PDF version of the programme here.

Participation is free of charge for all AES members.

We would like to thank Focusrite and SAE Institute London for supporting the AES student community by sponsoring this event. Without your help this event wouldn't have been the same!

 

 

 

 

All participants are required to register by filling up the form at http://aesserbia.org/register-today-for-3rd-ess-in-belgrade-2013/ or by sending an e-mail to: aesserbia@gmail.com. For latest updates you can also follow the event's Facebook page.

Accommodation is not included but the best hostel in the city is booked and waiting for your confirmation. Please right after registration send an e-mail confirming your arrival time to fun@mangahostel.com. Make sure to confirm your booking because it cannot be done via hostel browser or website! Take a look at Manga hostel at http://www.mangahostel.com/index.html.

Feel free to send any questions or comments to: aesserbia@gmail.com. We expect you with excitement and hope for another great student event!


Implementation: The Fourth Dimension of Game Sound

Date: 10 Sep 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: SAE Institute London
297 Kingsland Road
London E8 4DD

Lecture by Iain Hetherington, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe Limited.

A recording of this lecture is available here (mp3).

Just how important is the implementation of sound within a computer game? Standard approaches to improving the way that audio is played back within games are already established, such as variations in sample playback pitch and selecting random sample variations for a particular event. But, in a medium where technology is constantly evolving, is there such thing as a standard approach?

As we enter the next generation of console hardware and increased possibilities within game audio, there has never been a better time to stand back and contemplate the role of sound within our discipline. How do we continue to maintain its function within gameplay while stepping up the aesthetic quality to meet the expectations of our consumers?

In this lecture, Iain Hetherington will consider Valve’s Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as an opening case study. It is a first-person shooter that has chosen to provide a ‘no-frills’ soundtrack. While this is not incredibly cinematic or impressive from an aesthetic point-of-view, it provides the player with highly useable auditory cues that allow them to play the game more successfully. He will demonstrate how other games achieved this same level of feedback while improving the auditory experience, and how can we continue to do this in the future.

 


The Sound of Stonehenge - Tuesday 15th October 2013

Date: 15 Oct 2013
Time: 18:30

Location: School of Music, University of Leeds
University of Leeds
12 Cavendish Rd

Dr Bruno Fazenda, Acoustics Research Centre, University of Salford

Abstract

Stonehenge is the largest and most complex ancient stone circle known to mankind. In its original form, the concentric shape of stone rings would have surrounded an individual both visually and aurally. It is an outdoor space and most archaeological evidence suggests it did not have a roof. However, its large, semi-enclosed structure, with many reflecting surfaces, would have reflected and diffracted sound within the space creating an unusual acoustic field for the Neolithic Man.

This presentation describes acoustic measurement studies taken at the Stonehenge site in the United Kingdom and at a full size and fully reconstructed replica site in Washington State, USA. The aim of the research is to understand the acoustics of this famous stone circle and discuss whether it would have had striking effects.

Features of the acoustic response and state of the art modelling will be presented and used to discuss the existence or otherwise of audible effects such as flutter echoes, low frequency resonances and whispering gallery effects.  A description of an auralisation system based on ambisonic and wave field synthesis technology will be given. A stereo rendition of the sound of Stonehenge will also be presented to the audience.

Dr Bruno Fazenda researches and teaches in the areas of audio production and acoustics at the Acoustics Research Centre at the University of Salford. He is interested in room acoustics and psychoacoustics, in particularly in the assessment of how an acoustic environment or technology impacts on perception of sound quality. He is also involved in archaeoacoustics, where studies of acoustics of spaces linked to human activity in pre-history complement fields such as archaeology, ethno-musicology and acoustics of musical instruments.

 

Doors open at 18:00, for a 18:30 start - Directions to the School

Contact: Kerry-Anne Kubisa, AES North Chair - north@aes-uk.org for further information.

Twitter: @AES_North

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AESnorth